Frequently Asked Questions

Answers to some commonly asked questions can be found here. If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to give us a shout!

hidden

What is a domain name?
What is a TLD (extension)?
What is a gTLD?
What is a ccTLD?
How do I register a domain name?
What costs are associated with owning a domain name?
How can I find out who owns a domain name?
Why does my domain name matter?

How do I purchase a domain from FRD?
What payment methods does FRD accept?
When will I receive my new domain?

hidden

What is a domain name?

A domain name, or simply “domain”, is a unique Web address. Every business or organization that wants an online presence should own at least one domain name. Our primary domain is “frontrangedomains.com”. Domain names can be thought of as a type of virtual real estate.

hidden

What is a TLD (“extension”)?

A domain name consists of a top-level domain (commonly referred to as “TLDs” or “extensions”) and a second-level domain. Together they make up a unique address for anyone in the world to type into their Internet browser to access your website. In our case, we’ve chosen the “.com” TLD, with “frontrangedomains” being the second-level domain. The TLD is always the last part of a domain name, such as .com, .net, .co.uk, .com.au, .info, etc. There are hundreds of TLD’s in existence and many more may be on the way within the next year.

hidden

What is a gTLD?

A Generic Top Level Domain (gTLD) is a TLD/extension with three or more characters. There are currently 21 gTLDs, with many more likely on their way in the next year. Some examples of existing gTLD’s are:
.com (this is the preferred extension for most websites)
.net
.org
.mobi
.info
.biz
.name
.edu (Reserved for educational institutions in the US)
.gov (Limited to United States government organizations)
.jobs (Every company applying for a .jobs domain is screened)
.travel (Registrants must be verified participants in the travel industry)

hidden

What is a ccTLD?

Many countries have their own two-letter Country Code Top-Level Domains (ccTLDs) which are commonly used throughout that country. Most of these ccTLDs may only be registered by those who reside in that particular country, but some – called open ccTLDs – can be registered by anyone. Some examples of ccTLDs are:
United States: .us
United Kingdom: .uk
Australia: .au
Germany: .de
France: .fr
Spain: .es
China: .cn
Tuvalu: .tv (This is an open ccTLD and is often used for television/video websites)
Colombia: .co (This is an open ccTLD and is recently being marketed as an alternative to .com)

hidden

How do I register a domain name?

Domain names are registered through an ICANN-accredited registrar, such as GoDaddy.com or NetworkSolutions.com. Every domain name is unique and may only be registered by one person/company at a time. With well over 200,000,000 domains currently registered worldwide, in many cases you will find that someone already owns a domain name that you want. If this happens, you can either try purchasing it from the owner or choose a different domain.

hidden

What costs are associated with owning a domain name?

The biggest cost is generally the initial domain purchase, unless you’re fortunate enough to find an available-to-register domain name that is suitable for your purposes. Once you own a domain name, you will be responsible for renewing it every year that you want to keep it. If you fail to renew it on time, it will expire and someone else may then register it. New registrations cost anywhere from a few dollars per year for the cheapest options (such as .info), to well over $100 for some pricier TLDs (such as .travel). Domain renewals are generally around $15-25/year, but this varies greatly depending on the domain’s extension and the domain registrar being used. For example, at GoDaddy.com, our preferred domain name registrar, the yearly prices for .com, .net and .org are about $15, while the yearly price for a .tv domain is $40. At NetworkSolutions.com, those renewals cost $35 and $45, respectively. Domain names can be renewed for up to 10 years at a time, so with a little foresight you can save yourself from forgetting to renew a domain and losing it.

hidden

How can I found out who owns a domain name?

Many websites, such as DomainTools.com, offer free “whois” services to find out who owns a domain name. Simply enter the domain name you’re interested in and you should be shown the registrant’s contact information, including their name, mailing address, phone number and email address. It is possible for the registrant to hide his or her contact information with what’s called “Whois Privacy”, which is available for an extra fee at many registrars. Unfortunately this can make it difficult to make contact with some registrants.

hidden

Why does my Domain Name matter?

A domain name is more than your address on the internet; it is one of your website’s most valuable assets. A good domain name can make all the difference in the effectiveness of your branding and marketing strategies. If you’re developing a website for your business, do yourself a favor and build on a quality domain name from the get-go because it saves having to re-brand later.

hidden

How do I purchase a domain from FRD?

hidden

What payment methods does FRD accept?

For your convenience, we accept several forms of payment, including Escrow.com (a government-licensed third party that collects, holds and disburses funds only once the domain name has been successfully transferred to the new owner) and more conventional payment methods such as bank transfer, check and money order. PayPal.com may be used for some transactions.

hidden

When will I receive my new domain?

Once your payment has been confirmed, we will initiate the process to transfer the domain name into your account. The time necessary for this to complete will depend on the specific circumstance. If the domain is staying at the current registrar, such as GoDaddy.com or Moniker.com, the process is quite fast and you should have your new domain name in your account within a matter of hours. If you elect to transfer the domain away from its current registrar and to another registrar of your choice, that will take longer to complete – generally around one week.